Tgdaily brings us a Stanford paper about overcoming the physical limitations of our DSLR lenses. Up until now we have been capturing light. What Ren Ng is proposing is to store per pixel the length of every ray of light hitting the sensor from the object pictured. In this fashion we almost have infinite depth of field and we only need computation power to extract the information for the depth of field needed. The final display will depend on the tastes of the viewer. Imagine that, touch panels connected to enough power so the viewer can interact with the art in display, altering the artist point of view. Far out. http://www.tgdaily.com/hardware-features/56776-lytro-camera-lets-the-viewer-choose-the-focus Can't wait for the future. Carlos

23
Jun 11

Just when I thought that physical limitations were the ultimate barrier

Tgdaily brings us a Stanford paper about overcoming the physical limitations of our DSLR lenses.

Up until now we have been capturing light. What Ren Ng is proposing is to store per pixel the length of every ray of light hitting the sensor from the object pictured. In this fashion we almost have infinite depth of field and we only need computation power to extract the information for the depth of field needed. The final display will depend on the tastes of the viewer.

Imagine that, touch panels connected to enough power so the viewer can interact with the art in display, altering the artist point of view. Far out.

http://www.tgdaily.com/hardware-features/56776-lytro-camera-lets-the-viewer-choose-the-focus

Can’t wait for the future.

Carlos


22
Jun 11

Genetics: the future is here

But it is not evenly distributed.

20 years ago, you couldn’t tell if your kid was going to be born with a genetic anomaly. 5 years ago parents were selecting the genetic code of their kids to be used for their sick older siblings. Today, a lab has implemented the man in the middle attack in genetics by injecting their own instructions in genetic code to build a protein. Read on to glimpse the possibilities:

Team overrides faulty genetic signalling for first time
Posted on Jun 16th 2011 by Kate Taylor

Scientists have discovered an entirely new way to change the genetic code, bringing hope of treatments for devastating genetic disorders such as cystic fibrosis, muscular dystrophy and many forms of cancer.
The genetic code is the set of instructions in a gene that tell a cell how to make a specific protein. Central to the body’s protein production process is messenger RNA, or mRNA, which takes these instructions from DNA and directs the steps necessary to build a protein.
For the first time, researchers artificially modified messenger RNA – which takes instructions from DNA and directs the building of proteins, changing the original instructions to create a different protein.
“The ability to manipulate the production of a protein from a particular gene is the new miracle of modern medicine,” says Robert Bambara chair of the Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics at the University of Rochester Medical Center.
“This is a really powerful concept that can be used to try to suppress the tendency of individuals to get certain debilitating, and sometimes fatal genetic diseases that will forever change their lives.”
The researchers focused on a common type of mutation that occurs when an mRNA molecule contains a premature ‘stop’ signal, known as a pre-mature stop codon. This orders a cell to stop reading the genetic instructions partway through the process, resulting in the creation of an incomplete, shortened protein.
And the team was able to alter mRNA so that the ‘stop’ signal turned into ‘go’. As a result, the cell could read the genetic instructions all the way through and create a normal, full-length protein. The team produced the results both in vitro and in live yeast cells.
Around a third of genetic diseases are believed to be caused by the presence of these premature stop codons – meaning the technique could lead to treatments for diseases such as cystic fibrosis and some types of cancer.
“Previous research has presented other ways to modify the genetic code, but what is really unique about our method is that it is at the RNA level and it is site specific,” says study lead author Yi-Tao Yu.
“We can express the artificial guide RNA in a cell and direct it to make a modification at a single site and only that site.”

Source: tgdaily.com


21
Jun 11

Politics are going to kill me

Michelle Bachman claims CO2 is harmless. She knows better than the scientific community. Cap and Trade, started by president Bush is now socialism. Only 13% of Americans knows that 94% of scientists agree on global warming.

Who are these 13%? The intellectual elite? The elite that reads blogs and rss feeds and Reuters news? I guess we all agree that this country is going to Hell in a hand basket. We just disagree on how to veer out to a proper course. I think we need to look back at Brazil and Argentina. Brazil decided to put his money into training engineers ( education, democrats) while Argentina bet on psychologists (religion, republicans). Twenty years down the road, who has a very strong economy and a bright future ahead even with very left leaning presidents?

Be nice!